Twitter Traffic Machine

Want to Learn How to Piss Off 16,000 People in 90 Days?

Before You Buy, Read This!



I know how you feel.

You have a great new website, or a fantastic new business opportunity and you want to let the world know what it’s missing. You’ve heard a lot about social media and microblogging through Twitter of Facebook. You’re thinking: If I could just build up my list of Facebook friends or Twitter followers to a really big number, then all I would have to do is send out a message and new customers, new friends, new followers will all beat a path to my door.

Then you hear about a way to automate the whole thing, and you’re hooked!

That’s where I was about a month ago. I’d been working hard on a website about senior travel to the Yucatan. Finally, I was ready to “go live” and I started looking for ways to build traffic. On the advice of a friend, I purchased Twitter Traffic Machine , a “set it and forget it” system promising that after buying a simple guide and setting up a collection of online services I would be certain to have “16,000 new followers in 90 days.” Sounds great, right?

But since then I’ve learned that what looks like a short cut ends up being a long, frustrating detour.

Twitter Traffic Machine does provide everything that it promises except the one thing I bought it for. It does not automatically add thousands of followers. In fact, if used as instructed, it will very effectively annoy large numbers of potential prospects, replacing quality inter-personal communication with spam.

The Problem.

The problem lies in one specific element of the system: the solicitation to purchase Twitter Traffic Machine itself which is contained in the automated response to new followers. What this means is that if you follow the set-up instructions precisely, whenever someone decides to follow you, they receive a message looking for a sale.

Residents of the Twitterverse don’t like this. When I tried it, I received two replies which illustrate the point. One said “Can you please say ‘hi’ before trying to sell me something.” The other, more pointed, was: “No one wants your spam. C’ya!”

Why did I get these reactions? Twitter was designed around personal communication. Its question prompt: “What are you doing now?” can’t correctly be answered with anything except a personal message. Twitter purists don’t even want to know what you’re thinking, and certainly an ad or solicitation is inappropriate as a welcoming message. It is contrary to the whole spirit and intent of the medium.

So am I using Twitter Traffic Machine today?

Yes. Would I recommend it to others? Yes and I do…all the time, but only with this one very important caution: do NOT include that solicitation. Otherwise, the system is great. It will automatically feed high quality content to your Twitter home page, find you new followers and prune your list of those who are not following. It shows you how to automate your welcome message and, finally, it shows you how to keep track of all your results. In spite of the complexity of linking all this together, the series of clear, helpful video tutorials takes you through the process every step of the way.

The result?
Today I have a functioning system that does indeed connect me with new followers and keeps my current followers engaged and informed. It effectively augments my normal networking activities. But Twitter Traffic Machine is absolutely not a “set it and forget it system,” unless, of course, the thing you wish to forget is your reputation in the social media community.

The final assessment?

Twitter Traffic Machine is a good buy and a wise investment offering very helpful information at a good price. Use it wisely to support your efforts to make friends and develop relationships on the net. But save the pitch until you can make a valid offer based on a genuine understanding of your followers and their needs.

To check out Twitter Traffic Machine for yourself, click here.



To Return from Twitter Traffic Machine to www.yucatan-vactions-for-seniors.com click here